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HomeEventsA Short History of a Long Treasured Icon: the American Front Porch

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A Short History of a Long Treasured Icon: the American Front Porch

When:
Tuesday, July 20, 2021, 7:00 PM until 8:00 PM
Additional Info:
Contact(s):
Katharine Kosin
Category:
Public Event of Interest
Registration is required
Payment In Full In Advance Only
America engaged in a century and a half love affair with an architectural feature that no one actually needed but nearly everyone wanted. This talk from the Montgomery County Historical Society traces the history of the front porch through the social movements and architectural styles of the 19th and early 20th centuries, from the end of the Revolution to the beginning of WWII. There’s probably no other architectural feature that evokes such feelings of comfort, welcome, and nostalgia as the front porch. It’s an outdoor living room for leisure activities—for relaxing, visiting, entertaining, and people-watching—all out in the fresh air. At the same time, it’s an important architectural feature on the front of a house. It doesn’t just enhance the main façade; it’s often the most distinctive part of the design. Join Sandy Heiler as she discusses styles and features, history, and the true meaning of the front porch. Hosted by the Montgomery County Historical Society.